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New York
Veterinary Specialty
and Emergency Center

Surgeon

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Diplomate American College of Veterinary Surgeons

Allan Carb, DVM, DACVS, Board Certified Surgeon. Diplomate of American College of Veterinary Surgeons. Upon graduation from Auburn University in 1963, Dr. Carb spent 2 years in the U.S. Army Veterinary Corp. After completing a 3 year surgical residency at the The Animal Medical Center, Dr. Carb became a Diplomate of The American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1971.Except for 1 year as Veterinarian for Warner Bros. Wild Animal Park in West Milford, N.J.,Dr. Carb has been in private surgical practice.

Dr. Carb is a past president of the Long Island Veterinary Medical Assoc.,the Suffolk Co. Animal Emergency Service, chairman of the education committee of the American College of Surgeons, and the NYS Veterinary Medical Society Wildlife Conservation committee. He is a past recipient of Merit award from the NYS Veterinary Medical Society.

Dr. Carb has had papers published in textbooks and professional journals and has spoken at professional and breed club meetings.

Associated Services

Surgery

Publications

Emphysematous Hepatic Abscess Associated with Trauma, Necrotic Hepatic Nodular Hyperplasia and Adenoma in A Dog: A Case History Report

Peter F. Lord, BVSC, FRCVS, Allan Carb, DVM, William H. Halliwell, DVM, Phd, and James C. Prueter, DVM

Summary – A 13-year-old male Setter-Springer crossbred dog was presented with signs of acute peritonitis three days after blunt abdominal trauma. in abdominal radiographs, a bubbly accumulation of gas in the central and cranioventral parts of the liver silhouette and mild peritoneal effusion were seen. At laparatomy, firm, necrotic, nodular hepatic masses containing gas were found to be ruptured. The histologic diagnoses were hepatic adenoma with hepatic necrosis and nodular hepatic hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of hepatic abscessation and the radiographic differential diagnosis of extraluminal abdominal gas are discussed.

Subtotal Hemipelvectomy in the Dog

J.W. Alexander, D.V.M., Allan V. Carb, D.V.M.

Summary – The management of pelvic fractures is discussed and the factors involved in determining a suitable repair method in individual cases are considered. Three cases of pelvic fracture are presented and specific management techniques for each are described. Radiographic illustrations are included. Surgical intervention and primary repair in cases of pelvic fracture is suggested when the injury is characterized by marked decrease in the size of the pelvic canal, where the fragment can potentially impinge on the viscera contained within the pelvic canal or whenever there is involvement of the weight-bearing portion of the acetabulum. The technique of partial pelvectomy is presented for use in selected cases of malunited pelvic fractures as a potential salvage procedure.

Suppurative Arthritis

Allan Carb, DVM

Summary – Many terms such as septic, suppurative, infectious, and pyogenic are used to indicate the type of arthritis, that results in a joint contaminated by pathogenic organisms which may or may not contain purulent material. in man, and probably in the small animal also, there are many types of infectious arthritis: gonococcal, tuberculous, syphilitic, brucellosis, viral, mycotic, rheumatic fever, and suppurative. Suppurative arthritis is a form marked by purulent joint infiltration often due to trauma or pyemia. Septic refers to a condition produced by or due to putrefaction. Su ppurati ve arthritis probably best describes the type of infected joint we most commonly see in the small animal.

Oesophaegal Carcinoma in the Dog

Allan V. Carb and Dawn G. Goodman

Summary – Two cases of undifferentiated carcinoma of the canine oesophagus are described. Both cases presented with symptoms of dysphagia and vomiting and both were initially diagnosed by oesophagoscopy. Barium swallow radiographs in both cases revealed definite filling defects. Because of its si/.c, surgical excision was attempted in Case 1, but the dog died soon after surgery. in Case 2, the tumour was inoperable because of its extensive involvement of the entire anterior portion of the thoracic oesophagus and diffuse metastasis to the lungs.

Actinobacillus Lignieresii infection
in a Dog

Allan V. Carb, D.V.M., Edward F. Busch, Ph.D., and Si-Kwang Liu, D.V.M./ Ph.D.

Summary – Actinobacillus lignieresii was the causative agent of a large, diffusely infiltrating granulomatous mass in the thigh of a 7 1/2-year-old Boston Terrier. After unsuccessful attempts to excise the infected tissue and to treat the condition with sodium iodide, the infection spread to the regional lymph nodes, liver, and kidneys. The dog was finally euthanatized.

Diaphragmatic Hernia in the Dog and Cat

Allan Carb, D.V.M.

Summary – The management of pelvic fractures is discussed and the factors involved in determining a suitable repair method in individual cases are considered. Three cases of pelvic fracture are presented and specific management techniques for each are described. Radiographic illustrations are included. Surgical intervention and primary repair in cases of pelvic fracture is suggested when the injury is characterized by marked decrease in the size of the pelvic canal, where the fragment can potentially impinge on the viscera contained within the pelvic canal or whenever there is involvement of the weight-bearing portion of the acetabulum. The technique of partial pelvectomy is presented for use in selected cases of malunited pelvic fractures as a potential salvage procedure.

Leiomyosarcoma of The Caecum in the Dog

Allan Carb, D.V.M. Robert B. Barrett, D.V.M.

Summary – Tumors of the caecum are rare in the dog. Except for one, adenocarcinoma, all other reported cases have been sarcomas. This report describes three primary cecal tumors, all of which were leiomyosarcomas. Cases I and II were first seen and operated on the same day at the same institution. All three dogs underwent intestinal (cecal) resection and anastomosis. Cases I and III lived for only 2 months and 3 weeks respectively. Case II was still alive one year postoperatively.

Shoulder Artrography in Dogs – Radiographic Anatomy and Clinical Application

P. F. Suter and A. V. Carb

Summary – ARTHROGRAPHY implies the demonstration of the joint outlines by the introduction of a positive or negative contrast medium into the joint space. The surfaces of the articular cartilages and the synovial membrane, which are not visible on plain radiographs, thus become accessible for radiographic evaluation.

Arthrography has been used widely in man, mainly for diagnosing diseases of the knee and shoulder joints. Therefore, it was expected that arthrography would enable more accurate j-adiographic diagnosis of shoulder lamenesses in dogs.

Polycythemia Vera in a Dog

Allan V. Carb, D.V.M.

Summary – Polycythemia vera occurred in a 2-year-old male terrier-type dog. initially there were signs of central nervous system disturbance. Polycythemia vera was successfully treated by removing relatively large amounts of blood and administering uracil mustard to depress production of red blood cells.

Nodular Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Tendon in Two Dogs

Allan Carb, D.V.M. W. H. Halliwell, D.V.M., Ph.D.

Summary – in man the synovium is the source of histologically diverse neoplasms and neoplasm-like proliferations virtually none of which bear.0, the least resemblance to normal synovium. If it were not for the anatomic location, most would completely belie their synovial origin.

Besides rheumatoid arthritis, specific disease conditions of the synovial tissue in the canine have rarely been reported. This paucity of information also applies to specific disease conditions of tendinous tissue. Teno-synovitis of the Biceps branchii muscle has been incriminated. Generalized synovitis involving the larger joints is seen as a result of trauma and/or infection. This paper will describe a disease entity involving the Superficial Flexor tendon and its synovial lining in two dogs.

A Partial Patellectomy Procedure For Transverse Patellar Fractures in the Dog and Cat

Allan V. Carb, D.V.M.

Postoperatively (14 weeks  4 years) all three animals have normal use of the affected limb. in one dog, four years postoperatively, there is radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis of the patella but no clinical symptoms.