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New York
Veterinary Specialty
and Emergency Center

Surgeon

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Diplomate American College of Veterinary Surgeons

Dr. Arnold Lesser is a board-certified veterinary surgeon specializing in small-animal general, orthopedic,and neurosurgery. He began the Veterinary Surgical Referral Service 20 years ago to help extend advanced veterinary treatment to the Long Island and greater New York metropolitan areas and is now combining with North Shore Veterinary Surgery in the New York Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center.

A graduate of Columbia University in New York and the University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical School, Dr. Lesser has been a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons since 1982. He received advanced training in veterinary orthopedic surgery, including total hip replacement at The Ohio State University, and is certified by Penn Hip. Dr. Lesser has published numerous articles in veterinary journals and has written chapters for various veterinary surgical textbooks. He lectures on orthopedics and reconstructive surgery at local and national meetings.

He is a past president of the Veterinary Orthopedic Society and was chosen as one of New York’s Top Veterinarians by New York Magazine in 2002.

Associated Services

Surgery

Publications

Use of Grid Coordinate Technique for Implant and Foreign Body Removal

Arnold S. Lesser, VMD

A method of accurately marking the location of surgical implants for their removal was devised with the use of a sterile radiopaque grid. This grid enables the surgeon to mark the incision site while maintaining sterility, thereby, decreasing tissue dissection and exploration. Four surgical cases are presented which demonstrate types of implants that can be removed with the help of this technique.

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Segmental Bone Transport for the Treatment of Bone Deficits

Arnold S. Lesser, VMD

New bone can be formed by stretching an osteotomy 1 mm a day. If done properly, the callus formed will not bridge until distraction is discontinued, and a period of neutralization or compression then will allow the callus to transform into cortical bone. Two cases of infected, tibial nonunions are presented in which this technique was used to fill the bone defect created after sequestrectomy. Bone gaps of 5 cm and 2 cm were filled in a rottweiler and a cat, respectively.

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Complications from Improper Intramedullary Pin Placement in Tibial Fractures

Arnold S. Lesser, VMD

Although fractures of the tibial diaphysis respond well to intramedullary pinning, if a pin inserted retrograde into the proximal tibia emerges from the tibial plateau within the stifle joint, the pin end can interfere with joint motion.

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The Use of a Tendon Transfer for the Treatment of a Traumatic Sciatic Nerve Paralysis in the Dog

Arnold S. Lesser, VMD

A case of a traumatic sciatic nerve paralysis was successfully treated with the transfer of the long digital extensor tendon of origin to the vastus lateralis muscle after a portion of the latter had been separated from its insertion on the patella. A second procedure was necessary to shorten the distal tendon of the long digital extensor muscle to create the proper tension needed to fully extend the digits. Within 11 weeks after the surgery the dog was successfully returned to training and field trial competition. Viability of the transfer was further demonstrated by electrical stimulation of the vastus lateralis one year later.

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Pelvic osteotomy for treatment of pelvic malunion and obstipation in dogs and cats

Arnold S. Lesser, VMD

Pelvic osteotomy and realignment of fracture fragments can be used to correct malunion and chronic obstipation associated with narrowing of the pelvic canal. Malunited fracture fragments are separated, aligned in their normal positions, and stabilized with plates, screws, and/or pins. Even though patients may resume walking after treatment of pelvic fracture with cage rest, callus formation and/or pelvic collapse may result in chronic obstipation. A dog and 3 cats, with chronic obstipation secondary to pelvic fractures, were successfully treated with pelvic osteotomy and fracture realignment.

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Cancellous bone grafting at plate removal to counteract stress protection

Arnold S. Lesser, VMD

Fractures of the distal portions of the radius and ulna in dogs of small breeds can result in dual problems. During the healing process, bone atrophy is expected, especially if there is no weight placed on the limb. In toy breeds, there is little bone; therefore, atrophy leaves the bones fragile and susceptible to refracture. A second repair may necessitate bone grafts, and occasionally these cases may result in nonunion or amputation. To circumvent these complications, compression plating has been recommended to allow early weight-bearing, thus reducing bone atrophy caused by excessive disuse; however, stress protection from the plate also may result in bone atrophy. Because stress protection weakens the bone via osteoporosis, the timing of plate removal is important to reduce risk of refracture.

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